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name malvi, a taliban commander. as far as i could tell, it was a perfectly legal and good thing to do, but the blowback on the ground is something that -- can be furious and last friday i was at the pentagon talking to the joint chiefs legal advisor who we talked about this at length. one of the things that they try to do as they analyze and propose strike, what's the blowback going to be. >> on the ground. >> on the ground. you can hit a guy in the house, but if all the neighbors -- if that causes them to go join the taliban, you know, you have taken a big step backwards. he was trying to persuade me that they pay attention to that when they're looking at a proposed strike, but the problem is how can do you that from washington? very, very difficult. the evidence so far is in yemen, for example, enormous blowback. you know, the analysis that i've seen is that we've caused more harm than good there. >> ben, i wonder, the other -- there is blowback regionally, but there has been such a lack of discussion here, and i remember the "new york times" kill list story that raised hackles in t
said the taliban and al qaeda are two different elements. if we stay after killing bin laden, we have lost our purpose. he said the worst thing we can do is get bogged down without getting out. it wasn't that long ago, but it was interesting to look back a year and eight months ago to when bin laden was killed. i mean, at the time, anybody else think that maybe that would have meant we would come home from afghanistan? it seemed like one of the real possibilities that opened up with that almost unbelievable news on that cold night in may. but we did not leave afghanistan after this happened. this was roughly 600 days ago. we've got another 700 days ahead of us before the white house says this war will officially end, nearly two years from now. but how many american troops are left there between now and then? and what are those troops expected to do? how much fighting are they going to be doing? how much of our 11 and a half yearlong war is going to continue to result in americans getting hurt and killed between now and then? all of that remains to be decided. what is going to happen i
billion for them to be due to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic increase -- a decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. $4,000,000,000.5000000000 dollars for them to continue to host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a draw on strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. babalu remain a threat in that area for the force -- that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the worl
priorities backwards. if taliban takes control again in afghanistan, we won't have to worry about protecting drone bases or diplomats because we won't be there at all. and i think this is part of the unreality of the obama administration's approach there. the low troop numbers that they're contemplating, that they will be discussing with president karzai will not be any where near sufficient to accomplish our strategic objective, america's strategic objective which is defeating the taliban. and i think we're --. bill: it is fascinating. i apologize for the interruption how the events in benghazi are now shaping our foreign policy whether this administration wants to admit it or not. >> well that perhaps is the small glimmer of good news that they recognize that benghazi was a real debacle for our security policies for embassies overseas but the larger question here in afghanistan is the administration's unwillingness to do what we need to do to prevent 10 years of sacrifice and loss of life by our forces from simply being wasted if the taliban come back into power. bill: well this administra
strikes this year including the one that took out the taliban commander, the dep te a eight others in pakistan. the u.s. war on terror grown reliant on the unmanned vehicles that are prepared for flight an armed with the hell fire missiles. >> i believe john brennan taking over at c.i.a. will ensure that the drone program will comet. the administration has been -- and brennan particular, selling us on the fact that drones is the magic weapon. >> bret: >> reporter: president bam banal herted the drones from the predecessor. despite his criticism of bush, he has empanded the program employing agilities to authorize 300 drone strikes that killed # ,500 people. it has long strangeed relakes with pakistan and civilian who complain about the civilian casualties. >> we endeavor to redouse zillian casualties as much as possible. -- civilian casualties as much as possible. taking the fight to al-qaeda made the united states safer. >> worked to embed evidents to a strong legal frame wok. >> civil bi liberty groups. >> the u.s. government is using drones far from the battlefield to kill peopl
to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afgh
as separate compounds belonging to the pakistani taliban in south missouri stan. the taliban commander was reportedly among the dead. the ongoing drone attacks come days after a federal judge ruled the obama administration is under no obligation to publicly disclose their legal justification. the american civil liberties union and the new york times had filed a lawsuit under the freedom of information act demanding u.s. government disclose the legal basis for launching drone strikes overseas. the suit was filed after the u.s. kill the american-born cleric anwar al awlaki in yemen despite having never charged him with a crime. in upholding the obama at the ministration's right to secrecy, u.s. district judge colleen mcmahon expressed misgivings about the drone program itself writing -- the alice-in-wonderland nature some of the first details have emerged on the white house's effort to tackle gun control in the aftermath of last month's shooting massacre in newtown, connecticut. the washington buzz reports the task force overseen by vice- president joe biden is mulling proposals include
to afghanistan. we went to 9/11 because al-qaeda was there and it was in our interests. we up ended taliban government and we incurred some responsibility to help afghanistan set itself on the right course. we have largely done that. it's not perfect but women have rights that they didn't have before. there are six million females in school that wouldn't be if we had left it the way it was. >> neil: but not leaving a single troop there? >> i think president obama offered a strategic partnership to afghanistan back in 2009 when he authorized the troops. i think they need to know we are partners whether it's a certain number or amount of money or whatever, i think it's the idea that we are their ally and partner. we'll thereby to help them navigate. >> neil: you first arrived in 2002. you are a great student of history. that is what is really masterful in this book. so we have done our duty and we have done all we can do and time to go? >> it's partly our duty and partly our american strategic interests. when we arrived in 2002, afghanistan had already been torn by 23 years of war. the societ
of the taliban until the u.s. -led invasion of 2001. >> we are committed to doing everything we can to assist you in this time of transition to new afghanistan and afghanistan where people will be able to live in peace. >> it's now a democratic country with an elected government, with human rights for all. >> hamid karzai made his first visit to washington 11 years ago this month. >> how do you expect american forces to stay in afghanistan? >> as long as we are still have terrorist items. and as long as the bad guys are there. americans go out, unless we finish the job. >> how many american troops will remain after the u.s. combat mission ends next year is now being decided. karzai may not like the answer. >> president karzai relationship with president bush was very congenial. but it all changed when president obama came to office. president karzai got increasingly distant largely by the assessment by some there, the insiders in washington that president karzai was part of the problem. >> two nationwide elections have been held in afghanistan since 2001, but corruption persists and despite pledg
designed to hit us here in the u.s. and west and general taliban network and al-qaeda's low level fighters that is conducting operations and coalition forces in afghanistan. >> reporter: when asked today if john brennan directorship would result in intensification of the program, the white house declined to comment. >> shep: united nations reports that it can't get through to about one million hungry in syria. the syrian government is largely to blame. details ahead plus a new study suggests a popular blood pressure medicine could help your brain. that is coming right up. >>. >> shep: the syrian government that is shooting and bombing its people to death has found a new way to kill. blocking food aid to men, women and children. that is according to a report. the government restriction in syria and for security are preventing relief agencies to help people in serious need. the agencies are running low on food and fuel themselves. the united nations estimated some 4 million people in syria urgently need humanitarian aid. it has killed more than 60,000 people since march of 2011 according to
, continuing to provide advisorses. in other words, give them the tools to fight the taliban. i think that in fact they're going to be motivated, partly because the taliban are going to behave so badly like they did before that we will find afghans win to fight them. it might not necessarily be president karzai, but there will be afghan actors who will fight the taliban. >>brian: you say one of the things the soviets did wrong, the soviet union collapsed, gorbachev takes over, and the reason why what the afghans left collapsed is because the soviets cut them off. >> gorbachev continued to arm them. it was yeltsin. as soon as yeltsin took over at our behest, he took overt marxist regime and within months it fell. >>brian: you look at egypt and iraq, you've been to iraq when saddam was in power in afghanistan, and you say wait, when we pull out, they'll realize we are best friend they could possibly have. >> i think what they're going to find is their problems aren't over. in other words, they've got an awful lot of enemies in that part of the world. everyone hates each other more than
for afghan women as the taliban returns. i find that a very scary report. >> the other people scared are the pakistanis. >> right. >> looking at what's happening says kroog the border, if we are completely pulling out. what does it say about the surge and the american lives that were lost with that escalation? >> if you look at the pentagon's own most recent report on what's been the last six months in afghanistan, you will -- of the most recent -- the most repeat report from the pentagon on previous six months in afghanist afghanistan, you will see that the levels of violence that have returned to -- are now greater than presurge levels. this obviously brings us to the conclusion that the surge has made no difference. now, the military will disagree with that, and i would say the surge has made a difference in parts of afghanistan, in southern afghanistan, and helmand province especially where 20,000 marines were there. they're leaving soon. it did make a difference to some degree in kandahar, so i think the zero option is partly strategic. it was partly to negotiate with karzai to
back the taliban. but it was always clear that at some point, you know, whether it's 2014 or '15 or '16 that military's going to have to get smaller because the afghan government cannot afford to sustain it and other countries will not put enough money into afghanistan to keep numbers at that size. >> good to see you, chris lawrence. >>> a face-off erupting in china over freedom of the press. this is all happening in a place called guangzhou, a little more than 80 miles from hong kong. in a rare protest, chinese rallied outside the offices of the southern weekly newspaper. they were supporting the journalists who say that the government rewrote an editorial calling for politic real form and gave it a positive spin. a very positive spin. howard kurtz host of "reliable sources" and the washington bureau chief of "newsweek" and "the daily beast." a lot of people surprised that they wouldn't be censorship of something like this. this newspaper's had a bit of rope in the past to play with. why does this incident be a flash point? >> certainly has seemed to touch a nev, michael. the idea of a
, and that is, is that there are safe-havens as you mentioned inside of pakistan where the afghanistan taliban harbor, and the pakistanis are protecting them. we are hoping to make some progress with those safe havens as well. jenna: one of the reasons why that's so underlined if you will is because pakistan has nuclear weapons. no one really knows for sure human there is a big question about who can get their hands-on the tphaoeubg lar weapons in the wrong scenario, that is also something we're concerned about with north korea. we'll move onto this other sorry we've been watching, a strange one if you will. you have the former governor bill richardson who has made numerous trips to north korea. he's going with google bill schmidt saying it had a humanitarian focus. north korea recently tested another rocket are, and there has been increased pressure on that country. what do you make of this? >> i think the time is really awful. and it's disappointing they didn't listen to the administration. the administration -- jenna: they said, no, right they said we are going on this private mission. wash
in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away like that in these incredibly dangerous and challenging things, i know you worry all the time. certainly every night, i worry. but, you know, he loves doing what he's doing. he's brilliant at it. keep his head down and protecting our troops on the ground. i constantly meet the families of those who have lost their sons or husbands or brothers or sisters. i have some understanding, at least, of what they go through. >> reporter: prince william has also been back at works a rescue helicopter pilot. even on new year's eve and new year's day, risking his own life to save other people. matt? >> all right. mi michelle kosinski at buckingham palace today. michelle, thank you. >>> by the way, we're learning mo r about that never-before-seen photo of diana on friday. >> this was taken before her marriage to prince charles and was marked "not to be published." a lot of people wondered about the man in the picture. adam russell. they wer
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)